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Total Physical Response (TPR)

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Use some pictures of fruit, colours or body parts etc. Drill the kids by having them look at the picture and repeat after you........ ie....

banana, banana, banana, banana
Next picture strawberry, strawberry, strawberry, etc.

After that I would split them into two teams, have them line up . Put the pictures at the front of the class, facing the two lines. Then you call out one of the fruits, the first two students at the front of their line/team run forward, the first one to t ouch the correct picture ( and maybe say it ) gets a point for their team ! Those two students then go to the back of their lines and the next two have a turn !

I recommend using a teaching method called Total Physical Response (TPR) with beginning students. The advantages are: It's fun! It's non-threatening. It keeps their attention. They learn!

You do need some props. You start with a series of 6-10 actions that have a short verbal command. For example:

1) You're walking in the rain (pantomime walking with an umbrella)
2) Stop. There's a big puddle. Step over it.
3) Oh! It stopped raining. Close your umbrella.
4) There's some mud.
5) Slip in the mud. (exaggerate it)
6) Fall down. (humiliate yourself. They'll love it.)
7) Get up and look at yourself. You're all muddy.
8) Go back to the puddle.
9) Step in it.
10) Jump up and down.

The procedure is this: First, you pantomime the actions (It's not called physical for nothing!) as you say the phrases. (For the above example, an umbrella is a good prop.) Repeat this stage numerous times so that they can start connecting words with actions. Then, get a student to *act* the actions while you say the phrases. Do this with a few (or all) different performers. When they are ready to speak, have them repeat the phrases after you while you perform them. You can also have one student say the phrases while another acts them out. Finally, they will be ready to say and do the actions at the same time. This reenforces the meaning of the word. The physical act seems to help them remember the words.

Name: Ian
Email: language@gol.com
Location: Tokyo, Japan

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