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Using Personal Titles #3: Titles for Children, by Dennis Oliver

 

Using Personal Titles #3:
Titles for Children

 

In addition to strangers and people with positions of
authority, you will also need to use titles, at times, for
children--especially if you are speaking politely and
have just met a child and/or if the child's father or mother
has a position of authority or is someone you respect.

Here are some titles which are often used with children:

 

Titles for Boys:
young man

1.  

If you are speaking directly to a young boy and
want to be very polite, use young man in place
of a name:

How are you, young man?

What's your name, young man?

How old are you, young man?

     
2.  

You will sometimes also hear young fellow
instead of young man. These two titles have
the same meaning, but young fellow (often
pronounced "fella") is friendlier:

How are you, young fellow?

What's your name, young fellow?

How old are you, young fellow?

 

Titles for Boys:
Master

1.  

If letters, cards, and so on are written to
a young boy, the title Master is often used:

Master Jimmy Johnson

Master Thomas DeLuca

Master Ghassan Al-Thanayan

This use of Master is very polite: it's intended
to make a young boy feel important. If you
know a young boy very well, you can write
his name without a title.

     
2.   In American English, Master isn't usually
used in speaking.

 

Titles for Girls:
young lady

1.  

If you are speaking directly to a young girl and
want to be very polite, use young lady in place
of a name:

How are you, young lady?

What's your name, young lady?

How old are you, young lady?

     
2.   The title young woman isn't commonly used
in U.S. English. When it is used, it isn't used
for young girls.

 

Titles for Girls:
Miss

If letters, cards, and so on are written to a young girl,
the title Miss is common:

Miss Shannon Sperling

Miss Teresita DeLeón

Miss Tammy Kim

The title Miss can also be used for older girls and for
unmarried women.

_________________________________________

 

Special Notes

1.   Do not use young man, young fellow, or
young lady with people who are older than you
     
2.   In most English-speaking countries, do not ask
the question "How old are you?" except with
young children.

 

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