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Using Passive Voice (#5), by Dennis Oliver

 

Using Passive Voice #5:
Passive with Direct and Indirect Objects

 

In many sentences with passive verbs, the actual direct
object of the verb becomes the subject of the verb in
a passive sentence:

Someone is stealing Bill's car! (active) ----->
Bill's car is being stolen! (passive)

Someone stole Bill's car! (active) ----->
Bill's car was stolen! (passive)

Someone has stolen Bill's car! (active) ----->
Bill's car has been stolen! (passive)


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The passive can also be used in sentences that have two
objects--a direct object and an indirect object. Because
many sentences with both a direct and an indirect object
can be written in two different ways (with and without
to or for), the corresponding passive sentences can also
be written in two different ways:

Someone gave a million dollars to Bill. ----->
A million dollars was given to Bill.

Someone gave Bill a million dollars. ----->
Bill was given a million dollars


___________________________


Someone sent a crazy letter to Cathy. ----->

A crazy letter was sent to Cathy.

Someone sent Cathy a crazy letter. ----->
Cathy was sent a crazy letter.


___________________________


Someone will lend the money to you. ----->
The money will be lent to you.

Someone will lend you the money. ----->
You will be lent the money.


___________________________


Someone is passing a note to John. ----->
A note is being passed to John.

Someone is passing John a note. ----->
John is being passed a note.


___________________________


Someone has bought a present for our boss. ----->
A present has been bought for our boss.

Someone has bought our boss a present. ----->
Our boss has been bought a present.


___________________________


Someone will leave the directions for you. ----->
The directions will be left for you.

Someone will leave you the directions. ----->
You will be left the directions.


___________________________


Someone will draw a map for you. ----->
A map will be drawn for you.

Someone will draw you a map.----->
You will be drawn a map.


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Special Notes:

Some verbs show indirect objects with to, other verbs show
indirect objects with for, and a few verbs show indirect objects
with both to and for. Here a few examples:

to + I.O.   for + I.O.   to / for + I.O.
ask
feed
give
hand
lend
owe
pass
pay
promise
read
sell
send
show
teach
tell
write
  build
buy
draw
fix
paint
  bring*
leave*

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*  

bring (something) to (someone) means 'bring
(something) and give it to (someone).'

bring something for (someone) means 'bring
(something) that is intended for (someone).

leave (something) to (someone) means
'make arrangements for (someone) to have
(something) as an inheritance.'

leave (something) for (someone) means
'
leave (something) that is intended for (someone).'

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