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Conjunctive Adverbs (#5), by Dennis Oliver

Conjunctive Adverbs (#5):
Showing Unexpected Results

Conjunctive adverbs join sentences, not parts of sentences.
In choosing a conjunctive adverb, the relationship between
the sentences to be connected is very important.

When a sentence shows an unexpected result of another
sentence, only a few conjunctive adverbs can be used. The
most common ones are probably nevertheless, nonetheless,
and still:

Ahmed had the flu and should have stayed
home. Nevertheless, / Nonetheless, /
Still, he went to work.

Ahmed had the flu and should have stayed
home; nevertheless, / nonetheless, /
still, he went to work.

Bob had a flattire and traffic was very
heavy. Nevertheless, / Nonetheless, /
Still, he made it to work on time.

Bob had a flat tire and traffic was very
heavy; nevertheless, / nonetheless, /
still, he made it to work on time.

Lidia didn't study and had poor notes
from the class lectures. Nevertheless, /
Nonetheless, / Still, she got a high mark
on the test.

Lidia didn't study and had poor notes
from the class lectures; nevertheless, /
nonetheless, / still, she got a high mark
on the test.

 

Special Notes:

1.  

However can also be used to introduce an
unexpected result:

Ahmed had the flu and should have stayed
home. However, he went to work.

Ahmed had the flu and should have stayed
home; however, he went to work.

Bob had a flat tire and traffic was very
heavy. However, he made it to work on time.

Bob had a flat tire and traffic was very
heavy; however, he made it to work on time.

Lidia didn't study and had poor notes
from the class lectures. However,
she got a high mark on the test.

Lidia didn't study and had poor notes
from the class lectures; however,
she got a high mark on the test.

     
2.  

Unexpected results can also be introduced by
but or yet, but the punctuation is different:

Ahmed had the flu and should have stayed
home, but / yet he went to work.

Bob had a flat tire and traffic was very
heavy, but / yet he made it to work on time.

Lidia didn't study and had poor notes
from the class lectures, but / yet
she got a high mark on the test.

Important: In formal writing, do not begin
sentences with but or yet; also, do not write
a comma after but or yet.

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