Site Search:

Adjective Clauses (#4), by Dennis Oliver

 

Using Adjective Clauses (#4):
Types of Adjective Clauses
 

Object Pattern Clauses

In addition to subject-pattern adjective clauses, there are
also object-pattern ones. They have that name because
in them, the relative pronoun replaces the object of
the clause.

Examples

1.

The person called me. We met the person at
Jack's party. --->

The person who(m) (that*) we met
at Jack's party called me.

The sentence with who(m) has an adjective
clause: who(m) we met at Jack's party.
In the clause, who(m) is the object, but the
clause modifies (describes, explains, specifies)
the subject of the sentence: the person.

2.

I enjoyed talking to the person. We met
the person at Jack's party. --->

I enjoyed talking to the person who(m)
(that*) we met at Jack's party.

Again, the sentence with who(m) has
an adjective clause: who(m) we met at
Jack's party. Who(m) is still the object
of the clause, but here, the clause modifies
the object of the main sentence: the person.

   
3.

The trip was quite interesting. I took
the trip last week. --->

The trip that (which*) I took last week
was quite interesting.

The sentence with that has an adjective
clause: that I took last week. In the clause,
that is the object and modifies the subject
of the sentence: the trip.

   
4.

I enjoyed the trip. I took the trip
last week. --->

I enjoyed the trip that (which*)
I took last week.

The sentence with that has an adjective
clause: that I took last week. In the clause,
that is still the object. The clause modifies
the object of the sentence: the trip.

__________________________________________

 

Special Notes:

1.

Adjective clauses come after the nouns that
they modify:

wrong: *The person called me who(m)
we met at Jack's party.

right: The person who(m) we met
at Jack's party called me.

wrong: *The trip was quite interesting
that I took last week.

right: The trip that I took last week
was quite interesting.

2.

Do not use both an object pronoun and
a relative pronoun in an adjective clause:

wrong: *The person who(m) we met him
at Jack's party called me.

right: The person who(m) we met at
Jack's party called me.

wrong: *I enjoyed the trip that I took it
last week.

right: I enjoyed the trip that I took last week.

   
3.

The relative pronouns whom and that are
used to refer to people, but whom is more
common. Also, whom is used mostly in
writing and very formal speech, but who
is used for both subjects and objects in
everyday conversation and casual speech.

The relative pronouns that and which
are used to refer to things, but that is
more common.

Dave's ESL Cafe is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Banner Advertising | Bookstore / Alta Books | FAQs | Articles | Interview with Dave
Copyright 1995-2007 Dave's ESL Cafe | All Rights Reserved | Contact Dave's ESL Cafe | Site Map